Whether it's for opening the tops of bags of compost, digging out hideous tap-rooted perennial weeds or even marking out seed drills in an allotment, a knife is a must-have gardening tool! A garden fork is a quintessential tool for breaking up the ground, unearthing spuds and working in organic matter to beds.
by Garden Ninja
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: long
When I saw the scene in which the main protagonists jump into the sidewalk chalk painting and are transported into an animated world filled with bright primary colors, loud sounds, spinning carousel horses, and even dancing penguins, I had a cataclysmic response. Working from the outermost boundary of the front yard in toward the house, I began by creating a street-side berm to give me a degree of separation from the road and to keep water from running across the septic field garden.
by FineGardening
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: long
These naturalistic designs tend to be a bit wilder thanks to the use of native wildflowers and ornamental grasses, so they require less primping and preening throughout the year. Also, meadow gardens attract scores of pollinators and birds because of those specific plant choices and how they are layered in a naturalistic fashion.
by FineGardening
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: short
Johanna Smith here in Aiken, South Carolina, with pleasures and treasures from my fall garden. Osmanthus flowers may be small, but they pack an intense scent that fills a whole garden.
by FineGardening
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: short
The English Garden advent calendar: Day 6 Enter our day 6 prize draw for your chance to win a three month flower subscription from family florist Smith & Munson worth PS75. By The English Garden 6th December 2022 By The English Garden 6th December 2022 By The English Garden By The English Garden By The English Garden By The English Garden By The English Garden
by The English Garden
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: short
For instance, Paul Hicks from STIHL (opens in new tab) says that when winterizing lawn mowers, hedge trimmers, and grass strimmers, any dirt and debris gathered throughout the spring and summer should be removed. Her small garden in South London is a constant work in progress as she gets to grips with snail prevention, DIY trellises and what to plant in shady spots overrun with ivy.
by GardeningEtc
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: medium
Add an Urban Stone Landscaping Contemporary garden design works excellently with modern architectural styles, particularly the ones that involve concrete or wood homes and dynamic angles. Create a Simple Geometry For a sleek and modern look, use basic geometric lines like rectangles, circles, triangles, and squares as a base for your design.
by Balcony Garden Web
Tuesday 6 December
Reading time: medium
Trey wants to expand this "campus" to a square mile of these vacant lots, adding chickens, goats and whatever is compatible in this deeply urban neighborhood, with a goal toward food sufficiency and education. The important multi-layered work that Trey, Sam, Alex and others are doing here will contribute to the knowledge and motivation of the community, in particular, the kids who whose leadership skills are being honed by this generous, hardworking team of gardener/beekeepers.
by Gardening Know How
Monday 5 December
Reading time: medium
Transplant Shock And finally, shifting a new croton from its humdrum plastic nursery pot to a fabulous, well-draining, decorative container any floral diva would love is another cause for the letting go of leaves. Remember to keep the foliage clean; provide ample sunlight; water appropriately; dilute the fertilizer; monitor for pests and disease; relocate, repot, and transplant with care; and minimize temperature fluctuations.
by Gardener's Path
Monday 5 December
Reading time: long
I get plenty of questions about the sweaters I wear in my posts, and the projects I share on Instagram. Make sure to subscribe to Sara's Kitchen Garden on Youtube to get a notification when I release a new video.
by Sara's Kitchen Garden
Monday 5 December
Reading time: short
You Will Need: - 2 tablespoons black and pink peppercorns, slightly cracked - 3 sprigs of thyme, fresh from your indoor herb garden - 26 oz. This holiday cocktail combines hints of floral flavors with powerful sage to create an irresistible Christmas beverage.
by Platt Hill Nursery
Monday 5 December
Reading time: medium
Today Nancy Mellen is sharing some photos of fall foliage, berries, and other end-of-the-season beauties from her garden in Hingham, Massachusetts. Viburnum trilobum 'Wentworth' (highbush cranberry, Zones 2-7) produces beautiful white flowers in the spring, followed by showy red berries.
by FineGardening
Monday 5 December
Reading time: short
The English Garden advent calendar: Day 5 Day 5 of our '12 days of Christmas' advent prize draw gives entrants the chance to win 'An Introduction to Gardening Course' at The Yorkshire School of Garden Design, worth PS540. By The English Garden 5th December 2022
by The English Garden
Monday 5 December
Reading time: short
If the plants you have in mind are not evergreen, the stems will die back in winter to crown buds an inch or so above the soil surface, the Amateur Gardening team explains. Lupines come in a wide variety of colors, and they attract hummingbirds and butterflies, says Lindsey Hyland, gardening expert and the founder of Urban Organic Yield (opens in new tab).
by GardeningEtc
Monday 5 December
Reading time: medium
I immediately thought aliens had landed, choosing my garden to grow some kind of strange body snatcher type pod for cloning us. Upon further investigation, however (researching Google for similar oddities and turning to plant experts for help), I discovered that it was, indeed, just your average radish - possibly white or yellow.
by Gardening Know How
Sunday 4 December
Reading time: short
Finally, if you live in an area with cold winters, consider covering your lavender plants with straw or burlap for extra protection from the elements. - Make natural mosquito repellent - mix lavender essential oil, witch hazel, and vodka in a spray bottle for an all-natural bug deterrent.
by Gardeners' Magazine
Sunday 4 December
Reading time: long
Best of all, growing herbs for your indoor garden means accessibility and speed when you're cooking: just snip a few sprigs of your chosen garnishes directly from the plant, and add more flavor to your recipes in minutes. Dobbies (opens in new tab)' Senior Houseplant Buyer, Claire Bishop, suggests letting the herbs shine and pairing them with minimal accessories in muted tones for a put-together effect.
by GardeningEtc
Sunday 4 December
Reading time: long
The English Garden advent calendar: Day 4 Day 4 of our '12 days of Christmas' advent prize draw gives entrants the chance to win a stunning pyramid obelisk for your garden from Harrod Horticultural worth PS295. By The English Garden 4th December 2022 By The English Garden 4th December 2022 By The English Garden By The English Garden By The English Garden By The English Garden By Phoebe Jayes
by The English Garden
Sunday 4 December
Reading time: short
$29.97 The Original Tabletop Aquaponic Ecosystem Garden An all-time favorite with the kiddos, this self-cleaning fish tank aquarium grows lush organic microgreens on top. With 30+ floral illustrations on premium, high-quality paper with an iridescent foil cover, this coloring book's pages are perforated and removable so that you can frame your finished artwork.
by Urban Gardens
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: long
We close out with Dr. Allan Armitage*, who returns to share the Last Word on Solution Gardening. *Dr. Allan Armitage is also offering a discount for free domestic shipping when ordering his books expiring on December 6, 2022, at allanarmitage.net enter code LAST WORD at checkout.
by WashingtonGardener
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: short
For plants that are borderline hardy in the lower temperatures, I pile up some mulch and leave it there until the cold snap passes. Using Cloches One day, I hope to have a bigger garden, and the time to grow more vegetables and cutting flowers.
by Gardening Know How
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: short
The installation above was animated and accompanied by Tchaikovsky's 'Waltz of the Flowers', the music I usually use with my End of Month videos (note to self, yet again I have overlooked an EOMV post...grrr!). Together with the above, please enjoy a further five glowing pictures of Wisley, my contribution to the Six on Saturday meme hosted by Jim of Garden Ruminations.
by Rambling in the Garden
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: short
Follow the safety guidelines on the label and wear long-sleeved shirts, pants, closed-toe footwear, goggles, or a face shield when mixing or spraying pesticides. Another advantage of buying pest-resistant seeds is that they typically require less maintenance than other varieties since they don't need additional pest control measures or treatments.
by My Garden Plant
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: medium
Home gardeners control a huge amount of the open space in most cities and towns, so we have a major impact on wildlife and diversity. It's also important to make sure that babies and toddlers can't access the pond as they can drown in a few inches of water.
by The Middle-Sized Garden
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: medium
It is often said to be an indicator of ancient woodland and I remember it growing near my childhood home in Surrey, under oak and ash, usually in combination with common spotted orchids and wild garlic. Surveys (www.plantlife.org.uk) have found that pure E. non-scripta stands are more likely in wooded areas rather than other habitats, emphasising the preference for shade of this species over the Spanish bluebell that is better adapted to full sun.
by The Biking Gardener
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: medium
The English Garden advent calendar: Day 3 Day 3 of our '12 days of Christmas' advent prize draw gives entrants the chance to win lunch or dinner in the New Year at The Swan in Southrop for 2 people, worth PS80. By The English Garden 3rd December 2022 By The English Garden 3rd December 2022 By The English Garden By The English Garden By The English Garden By Phoebe Jayes By Phoebe Jayes
by The English Garden
Saturday 3 December
Reading time: short
By Brandie Bland During my internship with Washington Gardener Magazine this fall, I grew Black Spanish Radish (Raphanus sativus) and Blue Kale (Brassica oleracea). At the beginning of September, I planted my radish and kale seeds, watered and labeled them and crossed my fingers that there would be signs of life.
by WashingtonGardener
Friday 2 December
Reading time: short
Do have a look at the ones we have in our online shop - we are not surprised they are popular at this time of year (and we've got an offer on at the moment - you'll find it at the end of this) - I told you a few weeks ago that I was very taken with the idea with trying to grow a little 'prairie' meadow and had bought and sown some perennial seeds for it. If you are growing Brussels sprouts ready for the Christmas table, it's a good idea to stake the stems to stop them breaking in high winds or tipping sideways into the mud.
by the3growbags
Friday 2 December
Reading time: medium
My contribution to third day of Cathy's (Words and Herbs) Week of Flowers showcases a pair of bees enjoying the nectar of Veronica longifolia 'Marietta' in mid July, supported by persicaria (probably'Orangefield') and an agapanthus grown from a seedling supplied by Chloris of The Blooming Garden Looking back at pictures from my blog earlier in the year is such an uplifting experience, so Cathy's idea of making A Week of Flowers (chosen during the depths of what can be the greyest time of the year for many) an annual meme is a brilliant one, bringing joy to both participants and readers. Why not pop over to her blog and be wowed by her and other participants' contributions, and perhaps join in yourself?
by Rambling in the Garden
Friday 2 December
Reading time: short
I delivered and installed this wreath for our family friends whose all-time favorite color is red. I used a store-bought, inexpensive pearl garland for this one, combined with foraged white pine cones and bay leaves.
by FineGardening
Friday 2 December
Reading time: short
The English Garden advent calendar: Day 2 Our second advent prize is lifetime access to Willow Crossley's floristry course 'The Fundamentals of Floristry', worth PS127 from Create Academy. By The English Garden 2nd December 2022 By The English Garden 2nd December 2022 By The English Garden By The English Garden By Phoebe Jayes By Phoebe Jayes By The English Garden
by The English Garden
Friday 2 December
Reading time: short
While paperwhite bulbs can be planted in soil, more often they're grown in glass vases or jars with an attractive layer of pebbles to anchor them in place. 'Our favorite winter bulb is the paperwhite,' say Henrietta Courtauld and Bridget Elworth aka The Land Gardeners (opens in new tab).
by GardeningEtc
Friday 2 December
Reading time: medium
A tree or shrub that would otherwise go unnoticed when in leaf takes center stage now; bare, cold, and in flower or in color. The Acer palmatum 'Sango-kaku' (coral bark maple) living up to its common name-the lighting brings out the color.
by https://www.beebetternaturally.com/
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: short
Chives in winter are good for cooking and seasoning, but they should not be eaten raw because they contain thiophene, which has been linked with liver cirrhosis and cancer. Medicinal Properties It may surprise you to learn that chives can relieve stomach discomfort, prevent heart disease and stroke, and help fight bacteria that can cause illness.
by Real Men Sow
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: short
From pink oyster mushrooms and red hot chilli peppers to undercover treats that provide quick nourishment and variety, our round-up of vegetables to grow will keep you stocked up in winter warmers for months to come. As Amateur Gardening's organic veg expert Bob Flowerdew says: 'You can grow cress in shallow trays with moist paper towels and sit in a windowsill: the perfect accompaniment for all those turkey sandwiches!'
by GardeningEtc
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: long
As long as the weather isn't torrentially wet or frozen solid there are still a lot of things you can do in the monthly gardening calendar, from mulching soil to enrich it for next year, to pruning trees, creating colourful winter planters and even taking cuttings of your favourite perennials. If you choose a container-grown variety with evergreen leaves, scarlet berries, or one one of the best winter flowering shrubs, such as a Daphne odora, sweet box (Sarcococca confusa) or Viburnum x bodnantense 'Dawn', then you will have a pretty spectacle to greet visitors this festive season.
by GardeningEtc
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: long
A fundamental concept of Japanese gardens is to create a gravel area that simulates a quiet body of water and add large rocks that represent islands. In 2020 I added an outer border of dwarf Japanese barberry bushes (Berberis thunbergii 'Admiration', Zones 4-7) around the backside of the garden to better define the space.
by FineGardening
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: medium
The English Garden advent calendar: Day 1 Day 1 of our '12 days of Christmas' advent prize draw gives entrants the chance to win an overnight stay at Cotswolds spa hotel, Whatley Manor, worth PS900+. By The English Garden 1st December 2022 By The English Garden 1st December 2022 By The English Garden By Phoebe Jayes By Phoebe Jayes By The English Garden By Phoebe Jayes
by The English Garden
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: short
'Trees, shrubs and hedges are clipped closely and neatly with organic, curved, sweeping, and billowing shapes, echoing cloud formations,' Jessica - gardener and florist of Flower and Land (opens in new tab) - explains. Try cloud pruning a few different plants in your garden and creating a tapestry of structured, sculptural shapes, alongside fluffier, looser-pruned shrubs for balance.
by GardeningEtc
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: medium
Cool to Cold Areas Low temperatures for extended periods of time (all of Tasmania, most of Victoria, the southern highlands of NSW, the ACT and a tiny southern bit of SA) It's a great time of year in the garden in this part of the world, and it's not too late to pop these into the herb patch: dill, basil, chives, parsley, rosemary, pyrethrum, sage and thyme. Add some of these highly productive plants to your patch this month; carrots, cucumber, eggplants, lettuce, french beans, leeks, pumpkins, silverbeet, squash, sweet corn and zucchini.
by Sustainability through gardens
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: long
Sending out books wont be do-able from the housetruck so I'm shutting my shop - Friday 9th Dec is your last chance to buy a signed copy of either Edible Backyard +/or Pruning Fruit Trees. As we go, I'd love to connect up with community gardens + other wonderful organic happenings, so in order for us to easily find each other, I'm wading back in to Instagram.
by Edible Backyard
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: short
The benefits spread wide - to healthier water, air, animals + humans, moisture and carbon are retained, plants are well fed and protected, pests and disease slow down, and best of all, crops are residue free (as they jolly well should be). Midi Zen - For powdery mildew on cucurbits, grapes, strawberries, peas - spray when black spots appear on the underside of leaves, before the icing sugar look.
by Edible Backyard
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: medium
- Sprinkling slugbait (Tui Quash) or setting up beer traps, as soon as the carrots germinate prevents a mollusc midnight feast that leaves you empty handed. They will dry perfectly well, hanging in small bunches or laying in single layers in baskets or woven trays, somewhere warm, airy and out of direct sunlight.
by Edible Backyard
Thursday 1 December
Reading time: medium
You can prune the taller companion plant so the carrot tops have plenty of space to keep the airflow regulated and the roots won't hinder each other. Carrot also helps a tomato plant produce more flavorful fruit as the root crop opens up space for more nutrient uptake and healthy growth.
by Epic Gardening
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: long
If you are growing for the purpose of harvesting pea sprouts, aka shoots or microgreens, rather than allowing them to develop pods, a shallow pan about three inches high with holes punched in the bottom is adequate. Quick Reference Growing Guide The Peas Are in the House Imagine coming home from work, kicking off your winter boots, and heading to your indoor garden, where a fresh crop is ready for harvest.
by Gardener's Path
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: long
As a constantly sleep deprived, insomniac, I can't live without my fresh lavender in the garden. The soap is refreshingly fresh smelling, while the oil is used as an air freshener, in the wash, on my hair, and I have even made candles with it.
by Gardening Know How
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: medium
Wreaths made from fresh foraged materials are a wonderful way to make an entrance look welcoming or to jazz up a drab fence or garden shed. As you pick and choose which elements to harvest and add to your wreath, enjoy mindfully walking through nature and looking for the beautiful plant life that catches your eye.
by Garden Therapy
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: medium
Fibreglass Planter Fiberglass is a sustainable option since it lasts for a long period of time and can be used indoors as well as outdoors. You can attach the trellis on the top so the vines can climb easily.
by Balcony Garden Web
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: short
You used my photos in the GPOD two years ago (A Garden Full of Art and Flowers). Beautiful azaleas (Rhododendron hybrid, hardiness varies by cultivar) bloom in the backyard.
by FineGardening
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: short
Winter jasmine will happily scramble up a wall with little support, forming large bunches of climbing tendrils studded with starry bright yellow flowers - although white varieties are available - that lift the spirits even on the coldest days. Oberon Copeland, owner and CEO of advice website Very Informed (opens in new tab) likes its adaptability: 'First, winter jasmine is highly resilient and can tolerate both hot and cold weather.
by GardeningEtc
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: short
For specimens purchased in containers, however, you can also plant in spring if you're able to increase the amount of water you can provide at the beginning. How to harvest and eat medlar What's best is to pick them before birds start pecking at them, and bite in them as you tour around your garden.
by Nature & Garden
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: medium
The University of California's Integrated Pest Management Programs has a list of pesticides scored and ranked taking into account their effectiveness against cutworms and their environmental impact. That means keeping your garden cleanly weeded, or even covering empty beds with cardboard or tarp, could reduce your cutworm problems come spring.
by Essential Home and Garden
Wednesday 30 November
Reading time: long